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Exploring Nanosyntax$
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Lena Baunaz, Liliane Haegeman, Karen De Clercq, and Eric Lander

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190876746

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190876746.001.0001

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Functional Sequence Zones and Slavic L>T>N Participles

Functional Sequence Zones and Slavic L>T>N Participles

Chapter:
(p.305) Chapter 12 Functional Sequence Zones and Slavic L>T>N Participles
Source:
Exploring Nanosyntax
Author(s):

Lucie Taraldsen Medová

Bartosz Wiland

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190876746.003.0012

This chapter makes a case for morphemes as zones of functional sequence (fseq zones) in nanosyntax. Under such an approach, morphemes that compete for insertion with each other form the same fseq zone, whereas morphemes that co-occur together form different fseq zones. We illustrate this on the basis of the participle zone that is projected on top of verb stems in Slavic languages. We argue that in Polish and Czech, this participle zone spells out as L, T, or N, depending on its size and internal constituent structure. The constituent structure of this zone provides a direct solution to a long-standing puzzle in Polish and Czech morphology, namely why only unaccusative verbs build adjectival L-passives whereas all types of verbs build active L-participles.

Keywords:   fseq zones, spellout, participles, passives, unaccusatives, unergatives

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