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Power, Prose, and PurseLaw, Literature, and Economic Transformations$
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Alison LaCroix, Saul Levmore, and Martha C. Nussbaum

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190873455

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190873455.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

Gamblers and Gentlefolk

Gamblers and Gentlefolk

Money, Law, and Status in Trollope’s England

Chapter:
(p.51) 2 Gamblers and Gentlefolk
Source:
Power, Prose, and Purse
Author(s):

Nicola Lacey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190873455.003.0003

This essay examines the wide range of conceptions of money and its legal and social significance in the novels of Anthony Trollope—a writer whose nostalgia for the world of land sits alongside an increasingly sharp critique of the power of money—considering what his novels can tell us about the rapidly changing economic, political, and social world of mid-Victorian England. The essay concentrates in particular on Orley Farm (1861–2)—the novel most directly concerned with law among Trollope’s formidable output—and The Way We Live Now (1875)—the novel most directly concerned with the use and abuse of money in the early world of financial capitalism.

Keywords:   law, money, regulation, capitalism, gender, status, companies, commerce, professionalization

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