Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Identities in Everyday Life$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jan E. Stets and Richard T. Serpe

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190873066

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190873066.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 November 2019

Authenticity and the Religious Identity

Authenticity and the Religious Identity

Chapter:
(p.75) 5 Authenticity and the Religious Identity
Source:
Identities in Everyday Life
Author(s):

Philip S. Brenner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190873066.003.0005

This chapter reports the findings of a study comparing the association of religious behavior with two identity-related concepts, testing their potential as a source of survey response bias in the self-reported measure of religious attendance. Religious identity prominence is defined as the value one places on one’s religious identity. Respondents with prominent religious identities interpret the religious attendance question in a way that allows them to report on their self-view as religious people rather than on their religious behavior. Religious authenticity is defined as the desire to be and be seen as who one “really is.” Respondents are motivated to demonstrate their authentic religious selves by reporting that they are the “kind of person” who attends. Results suggest that religious identity prominence, but not religious authenticity, positively influences reports of religious attendance. These findings shed light on the potential sources of error in survey measures of religious attendance and ways we might avoid them in the future.

Keywords:   authenticity, church attendance, identity, identity prominence, identity salience, measurement, religion, religious identity, self-esteem, survey research

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .