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THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY YEARBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE 2016$
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Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190848194

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190848194.001.0001

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Introductory Note

Introductory Note

The Judicial Legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda: The Revival of International Criminal Law at the End of the 20th Century

Chapter:
(p.449) VI.1 Introductory Note
Source:
THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY YEARBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE 2016
Author(s):

Anna Oriolo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190848194.003.0025

With the completion of the Appeals Chamber’s Nyiramasuhuko et al. (or Butare) case, the ICTR formally closed its doors on 31 December 2015 with a verdict that has gone down in history on the grounds that Pauline Nyiramasuhuko, the only female to be indicted by the ICTR, is the first woman to be charged (and convicted) for genocide and rape as crimes against humanity before an international court. Since its opening in 1995, the Tribunal has indicted ninety-three individuals comprising high-ranking military and government officials, politicians, businessmen as well as religious, militia and media leaders, concluding proceedings for eighty-five accused. Throughout its two decades of work, the Tribunal produced a substantial body of jurisprudence on genocide and other serious violations of international humanitarian law, playing a pioneering role in establishing a credible international criminal justice system.

Keywords:   Butare case, completion strategy, cross-fertilization, gender related crimes, genocide, guilty plea, ICTR legacy, media, MICT, propaganda, rape

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