Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Joseph E. Uscinski

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190844073

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190844073.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 10 December 2019

Don’t Trust the Scientists! Rejecting the Scientific Consensus “Conspiracy”

Don’t Trust the Scientists! Rejecting the Scientific Consensus “Conspiracy”

Chapter:
(p.201) 13 Don’t Trust the Scientists! Rejecting the Scientific Consensus “Conspiracy”
Source:
Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them
Author(s):

Josh Pasek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190844073.003.0013

Scholars assessing the public understanding of science have long regarded informing Americans about scientific facts as key to raising Americans’ scientific literacy. But many Americans appear to be aware of the scientific consensus and nonetheless reject it. The individuals who are aware of the scientific consensus and reject its tenets tend to distrust scientists. They also focus their rejection on particular issues for which they may be otherwise motivated. This rejection may be driven by elites, who argue against the scientific consensus on issues like climate change by asserting either that the science is unsettled or by contending that the scientific consensus is itself a conspiratorial ploy. Individuals’ patterns of beliefs seem to imply that they view scientific evidence they dislike as the result of a conspiracy.

Keywords:   conspiracy theory, science, trust, consensus, climate change

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .