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Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for GodThe Plantinga Project$
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Jerry L. Walls and Trent Dougherty

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190842215

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190842215.001.0001

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Arguments from Providence and from Miracles

Arguments from Providence and from Miracles

Of Miracles: The State of the Art and the Uses of History

Chapter:
(W) Arguments from Providence and from Miracles
Source:
Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God
Author(s):

Timothy McGrew

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190842215.003.0021

The mid-20th century consensus regarding Hume’s critique of reported miracles has broken down dramatically in recent years thanks to the application of probabilistic analysis to the issue and the rediscovery of its history. Progress from this point forward is likely to be made along one or more of three fronts. There is wide room for interdisciplinary collaboration, work that will bring together scholars with expertise in religion, psychology, philosophy, and empirical science. There is a great deal of work still to be done in formal analysis, making use of the tools of modern probability theory to model questions about testimony and inference. And the recovery and study of earlier works on the subject—works that should never have been forgotten—can significantly enrich our understanding of the underlying issues.

Keywords:   Miracles, Charles Leslie, David Hume, William Paley, J.L. Mackie, John Earman, Bayes’s Theorem

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