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Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for GodThe Plantinga Project$
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Jerry L. Walls and Trent Dougherty

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190842215

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190842215.001.0001

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The General Argument from Intuition

The General Argument from Intuition

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Chapter:
(Q) The General Argument from Intuition
Source:
Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God
Author(s):

Robert C. Koons

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190842215.003.0015

Argument Q, the seventeenth argument in Plantinga’s battery, concerns the problem of explaining how we can take seriously our capacity for intuition in such areas as logic, arithmetic, morality, and philosophy. This argument involves a comparison between theistic and non-theistic accounts of these cognitive capacities of human beings. The argument can take three forms: an inference to the best explanation, an appeal to something like the causal theory of knowledge, and an argument turning on the potential threat of undercutting epistemic defeaters concerning the reliability of intuition. All three support the conclusion that we can have intuitive knowledge only if the reliability of that intuition is adequately grounded, as it can be by God’s creation of us.

Keywords:   intuition, defeaters, reliability, natural selection, evolutionary debunking, naturalism, theism, counterfactual conditional, necessary truth, concept possession

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