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Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for GodThe Plantinga Project$
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Jerry L. Walls and Trent Dougherty

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190842215

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190842215.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God
Author(s):

Jerry L. Walls

Trent Dougherty

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190842215.003.0001

Alvin Plantinga is one of the seminal philosophers of religion of the latter half of the twentieth century. One of his most distinctive and important contributions to the philosophy of religion is his carefully articulated defense of the claim that belief in God can be properly basic. Despite his contention that arguments are not needed for rational belief in God, he has made the case that there are still lots of good ones available. This introduction outlines the development of Plantinga’s arguments, including their introduction at a 1986 conference. The arguments are compared and contrasted with Richard Swinburne’s more traditional (yet still innovative) approach to the topic. Plantinga’s two dozen arguments cover a wide range of approaches, including metaphysics, ontology, epistemology, morality, rationality, and others. In the spirit of Plantinga’s parenthetical “(or so),” the chapter introduces a handful of additional arguments not among his original two dozen.

Keywords:   Alvin Plantinga, Richard Swinburne, epistemology, rationality, ontology, arguments, God

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