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The Only Constant is ChangeTechnology, Political Communication, and Innovation Over Time$
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Ben Epstein

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190698980

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190698980.001.0001

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Political Choice

Political Choice

The Behavioral Role in Political Communication Change

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 Political Choice
Source:
The Only Constant is Change
Author(s):

Ben Epstein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190698980.003.0004

Chapter 4 explains the concept of political choice, the second and most important phase of the political communication cycle (PCC). The political choice phase is the process in which political actors choose if and when to incorporate new information and communications technologies (ICTs) into their communication strategies. This chapter details the process that political actors or organizations go through when determining whether to innovate and helps to identify characteristics of those parties that are more likely to innovate earlier than others, known as innovativeness. Political choice is the behavioral component of the political communication cycle. These innovation decisions are the primary determinants regarding if and how ICT innovations are used to change political communication activity. Therefore, political choice is the most important phase of the PCC, differentiating political communication change from social and societal communication change more broadly.

Keywords:   political communication cycle, political choice, diffusion of innovations, innovativeness, innovativeness matrix, S-curve

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