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Pharmaceutical FreedomWhy Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate$
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Jessica Flanigan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190684549

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190684549.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.230) 8 Conclusion
Source:
Pharmaceutical Freedom
Author(s):

Jessica Flanigan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190684549.003.0008

Arguments in favor of rights of self-medication have revisionary implications for existing drug approval policies and drug prohibitions. Specifically, in order to respect people’s rights of self-medication public officials should not prohibit competent adults from purchasing and using (almost) any drugs. These implications may seem dangerous to some readers, but the current system is dangerous as well, and patients cannot consent to the risks associated with prohibitive policies. Even if public officials adopted policies that respected patient’s rights of self-medication, people who are concerned about the dangers of using pharmaceuticals could still consult a physician, government certification, or other experts before using a drug. In the twentieth century, patients benefited from increasing acceptance of the doctrine of informed consent. Pharmaceutical freedom is the next step.

Keywords:   pharmaceutical policy, paternalism, informed consent, drug policy enforcement, moral, progress

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