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Dissemination and Implementation Research in HealthTranslating Science to Practice$
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Ross C. Brownson, Graham A. Colditz, and Enola K. Proctor

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190683214

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190683214.001.0001

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Evaluation Approaches for Dissemination and Implementation Research

Evaluation Approaches for Dissemination and Implementation Research

Chapter:
(p.317) 19 Evaluation Approaches for Dissemination and Implementation Research
Source:
Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health
Author(s):

Bridget Gaglio

Russell E. Glasgow

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190683214.003.0019

Considerable progress has been made in evaluation of dissemination and implementation science and research; however, we are still lacking knowledge in several key areas. The complex, inherently multilevel and contextual nature of dissemination and implementation science, and the always (sometimes rapidly) changing environment, present ongoing challenges. Given these challenges, evaluation of dissemination and implementation efforts need more adapted, novel, refined and sophisticated approaches to evaluation and especially, more pragmatic measures. To advance our present state of science, the question that we need to ask (and be able to answer) is “What are the characteristics of interventions that can reach large numbers of people, especially those who can most benefit, be adopted broadly by different settings, be consistently implemented by different staff members with moderate levels of training and expertise, and produce replicable and long-lasting effects (and minimal negative impact) at a reasonable cost?”

Keywords:   design, evaluability assessment, evaluation, pragmatic models, qualitative, quantitative

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