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China and the Geopolitics of Rare Earths$
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Sophia Kalantzakos

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190670931

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190670931.001.0001

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Resource Competition, Mineral Scarcity, and Economic Statecraft

Resource Competition, Mineral Scarcity, and Economic Statecraft

Chapter:
(p.10) 1 Resource Competition, Mineral Scarcity, and Economic Statecraft
Source:
China and the Geopolitics of Rare Earths
Author(s):

Sophia Kalantzakos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190670931.003.0002

Resources have been essential inputs in the world economy and at the epicenter of technological developments. There are different theories of resource scarcity, but uninterrupted access to resources is vital to modern economies, especially since modern technological applications demand resource inputs from across the globe. Physical depletion and flow disruption, therefore, both pose a series of challenges for policymakers and industry. The examination of China’s use of economic statecraft in the case of the rare-earth crisis and the corresponding response of the European Union, the United States, and Japan provide a salient example of how resource dominance can spill over into global power politics.

Keywords:   resource competition, economic statecraft, scarcity, flow disruption, inputs, depletion

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