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Estrogens and MemoryBasic Research and Clinical Implications$
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Karyn M. Frick

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190645908

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190645908.001.0001

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Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Memory Consolidation

Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Memory Consolidation

Chapter:
(p.119) 8 Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Memory Consolidation
Source:
Estrogens and Memory
Author(s):

Karyn M. Frick

Jaekyoon Kim

Wendy A. Koss

Jennifer J. Tuscher

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190645908.003.0009

Research from the past decade has begun to shed light on the neural mechanisms through which the potent estrogen 17β‎-estradiol (E2) regulates the formation of memories. Consolidation is a rapid process which appears to take advantage of the ability of estrogen receptors to quickly trigger cell signaling alterations that increase gene expression, local protein synthesis, and dendritic spinogenesis. This chapter discusses recent advances in understanding how the rapid effects of E2 on the hippocampus influence memory consolidation in female and male rodents and examines new directions for exploring similar mechanisms in other interconnected brain regions.

Keywords:   cell signaling, ERK, hippocampus, dendritic spines, estrogen receptors, prefrontal cortex, aromatase

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