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Estrogens and MemoryBasic Research and Clinical Implications$
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Karyn M. Frick

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190645908

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190645908.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 02 June 2020

Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Dendritic Spines and Synaptic Plasticity in the Male and Female Hippocampus

Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Dendritic Spines and Synaptic Plasticity in the Male and Female Hippocampus

Chapter:
(p.38) 3 Rapid Effects of Estradiol on Dendritic Spines and Synaptic Plasticity in the Male and Female Hippocampus
Source:
Estrogens and Memory
Author(s):

Asami Kato

Gen Murakami

Yasushi Hojo

Sigeo Horie

Suguru Kawato

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190645908.003.0004

Although the potent estrogen, 17β‎-estradiol (E2), has long been known to regulate the hippocampal dendritic spine density and synaptic plasticity, the molecular mechanisms through which it does so are less well understood. This chapter discusses the rapid modulation of hippocampal dendritic spine density and synaptic plasticity in male and female rats, with particular attention to studies in hippocampal slices from male rats. Among the mechanisms described are the roles of specific cell-signaling kinases and estrogen receptors in mediating the effects of E2 and progesterone on hippocampal neurons. In addition, dynamic changes of spine structures over time and sex differences in spine regulation are also considered. Finally, the chapter ends by discussing the importance of local hippocampal synthesis of E2 and androgens to hippocampal spine morphology and plasticity.

Keywords:   estradiol, dendritic spines, spinogenesis, long-term potentiation, hippocampus, cell signaling, kinase, sex differences, progesterone, androgens

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