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Leipzig After BachChurch and Concert Life in a German City$
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Jeffrey S. Sposato

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190616953

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190616953.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Leipzig After Bach
Author(s):

Jeffrey S. Sposato

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190616953.003.0005

The introduction explains the importance of sacred music to public concert life in the city of Leipzig. In 1778, Johann Adam Hiller, music director of the Musikübende Gesellschaft, published a booklet to accompany the forthcoming Concerts Spirituels. In it, he described the city’s public concert programming, which was heavily influenced by church music. Leipzig churches were dominated by Lutheran orthodoxy. Public concert music arose in connection to Leipzig’s trade fairs. Between 1743 and 1847, public concert music in Leipzig was influenced by sacred music, including traditional Greek and Latin liturgical texts that were part of Lutheranism in Saxony. Many public concert directors later went on to serve as Thomaskantor. This pattern was very different from the rise of public concerts in Paris, London, Hamburg, Vienna, and Berlin, which arose from secular institutions.

Keywords:   Johann Adam Hiller, sacred music, church music, public concert, Leipzig, trade fair, Lutheranism, Lutheran orthodoxy, Thomaskantor, Concerts Spirituels

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