Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Good Life on a Finite EarthThe Political Economy of Green Growth$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel J. Fiorino

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190605803

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190605803.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2020

Inequality and Green Growth

Inequality and Green Growth

Chapter:
(p.98) 5 Inequality and Green Growth
Source:
A Good Life on a Finite Earth
Author(s):

Daniel J. Fiorino

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190605803.003.0005

This chapter examines the role of economic inequality in influencing a society’s capacity for ecological protection and green growth. Its premise is that for two similar political systems differing only in their degree of inequality, the less unequal one will have advantages. Although there still is limited research on the role of income and wealth inequality in influencing ecological performance, evidence suggests that more economically equitable societies hold an advantage. This is partly due to economic factors, such as the tendency in more unequal societies to promote consumption based on status competition and positional goods, but there is evidence of political and social factors as well. High economic inequality increases social mistrust and distance, which undermines the ability to collectively value public goods. Any green growth strategy should account for the sources of and effects of inequality.

Keywords:   economic inequality, environmental justice, social trust, collective action, ecological public goods, consumption

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .