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Unequal FoundationsInequality, Morality, and Emotions across Cultures$
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Steven Hitlin and Sarah K. Harkness

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190465407

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190465407.001.0001

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Empirical Analysis

Empirical Analysis

Chapter:
(p.153) 9 Empirical Analysis
Source:
Unequal Foundations
Author(s):

Steven Hitlin

Sarah K. Harkness

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190465407.003.0009

Chapter 9 presents our empirical results. The chapter begins with a description of the competing theories’ predictions for how the countries under analysis (the United States, China, Germany, Japan, and Canada) should differ by their moral reactions. We then present results demonstrating that the negative self-sanctioning and other-sanctioning moral emotions are far more common in the United States and China—countries with high levels of inequality. Conversely, the self-transcendent, communal moral emotions, like compassion and praise, are more often experienced in Germany, Japan, and Canada—countries with much lower inequality. This is consistent with our theoretical predictions.

Keywords:   Affect Control theory, Interact, simulations, moral emotions, inequality, social interaction, culture, social psychology

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