Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
PhallaciesHistorical Intersections of Disability and Masculinity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kathleen M. Brian and James W. Trent, Jr.

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190458997

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190458997.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 December 2019

Down and Out

Down and Out

American Male Beggars’ Presentations, 1860s–1930s

Chapter:
(p.194) 9 Down and Out
Source:
Phallacies
Author(s):

Robert Bogdan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190458997.003.0010

In the past, in many people’s minds, begging went hand and hand with disabilities. People with incapacitations have always been overrepresented in the ranks of beggars, and among them male solicitors have significantly outnumbered their female counterparts. Indeed, men with disabilities dominated the ranks of beggars in the United States from 1860s to the 1930s. This chapter examines begging cards, photographic images, and accompanying texts that these mendicants distributed to solicit donations from would-be patrons by analyzing the historical and cultural circumstances of those who created and consumed them. In doing so, it also argues for the significance of alternative archives for excavating histories of disabled men.

Keywords:   disability, mendicancy, begging cards, beggars, solicitor, disabled men

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .