Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
BorrowingLoanwords in the Speech Community and in the Grammar$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shana Poplack

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190256388

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190256388.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 11 November 2019

Confirmation through replication

Confirmation through replication

Other language pairs, other diagnostics

Chapter:
(p.97) 7 Confirmation through replication
Source:
Borrowing
Author(s):

Shana Poplack

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190256388.003.0007

This chapter reviews a series of replications of the studies reported in previous chapters on eight typologically distinct language pairs, making use of a wide array of phonological, morphological, and syntactic diagnostics (e.g., vowel harmony, word order, case-marking, adjectival expression, nominal determination patterns, verb incorporation strategies). Wherever a conflict site between donor and recipient languages could be determined, lone items were systematically shown to behave like the latter, often to the point of assuming the fine details of its variable quantitative conditioning. Results confirm that the integration process and its outcome—grammatical identity of donor-language items with recipient-language counterparts—are universal.

Keywords:   replication, loanword diagnostics, quantitative conditioning, conflict sites, variability, integration, universality of integration

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .