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Sabina AugustaAn Imperial Journey$
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T. Corey Brennan

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190250997

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190250997.001.0001

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The Journey to Egypt

The Journey to Egypt

Chapter:
(p.95) 7 The Journey to Egypt
Source:
Sabina Augusta
Author(s):

T. Corey Brennan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190250997.003.0007

The chapter first discusses the only purported quotation Sabina receives in our literary sources, a bitter boast about avoiding pregnancy with Hadrian. It seems her received stereotype was disagreeability, complementing Hadrian’s alleged pacifism and self-contradiction. The chapter then studies the first three years of Hadrian’s Third Journey of 128–133, in which Sabina clearly participated. Possible echoes of Sabina’s presence are evaluated for the first eastern stages, in Athens, Asia Minor, Syria, Arabia, and Judaea, followed by Alexandria in Egypt in fall 130. Dated Alexandrian coins suggest that Sabina changed her appearance during that visit, literally letting her hair down from its expected “Matidian” style. In late October 130 Hadrian’s companion Antinoös drowned in the Nile. The chapter treats Antinoös’ posthumous semi-divine honors and cult, and further describes his eponymous city, Antinoöpolis, in Egypt, which (it is argued) illuminates Hadrian’s and Sabina’s self-presentation in the 130s.

Keywords:   Jerusalem, Aelia Capitolina, Egypt, Nile, Alexandria, Antinoös, Antinoöpolis, cult, medallions

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