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Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention$
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Michael Thun, Martha S. Linet, James R. Cerhan, Christopher A. Haiman, and David Schottenfeld

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190238667

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190238667.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 February 2020

Framework for Understanding Cancer Prevention

Framework for Understanding Cancer Prevention

Chapter:
(p.1193) 61 Framework for Understanding Cancer Prevention
Source:
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention
Author(s):

Michael J. Thun

Christopher P. Wild

Graham Colditz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190238667.003.0061

The worldwide increase in the number of people affected by cancer and the costs of cancer care has increased the urgency of efforts to translate knowledge about the causes of cancer into effective preventive interventions. A wide range of interventions has proven to be effective for cancer prevention, either by reducing exposure to known causes of human cancer or by disrupting the multistage progression of tumors. Examples of progress include the up to 40% decrease in the age-standardized lung cancer incidence rate among men in high- and middle-income countries due to tobacco control; the 30% decrease in colorectal cancer incidence in the United States from widespread screening and the removal of precursor adenomatous tumors; the decreased prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in East Asia due to neonatal vaccination; and protection against excessive sun exposure and decreased incidence of melanoma and keratinocytic carcinomas in Australia.

Keywords:   cancer prevention, lung cancer, vaccination, screening, research

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