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The Political History of American Food AidAn Uneasy Benevolence$
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Barry Riley

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190228873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190228873.001.0001

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“But Now Came Famine and Pestilence”

“But Now Came Famine and Pestilence”

Chapter:
(p.33) 3 “But Now Came Famine and Pestilence”
Source:
The Political History of American Food Aid
Author(s):

Barry Riley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190228873.003.0004

The end of the war brought Hoover no relief. Now hunger stalked not only the Allied states and occupied countries but the defeated enemy states as well, plus a number of new countries hatched amid the aftermath of war. Adding to his headaches, the Allied governments quarreled with Hoover and with each other over how—or whether—Germany and its allies should receive any food at all until the issue of war reparations was resolved. Tens of millions—perhaps hundreds of millions—of people needed food aid to prevent starvation until their own agricultural production and marketing could resume and populations were at work again, earning the money needed to buy that food as it became available. Hoover would have to convince a suspicious public and a reluctant Congress of the need to feed those who only weeks earlier had been the enemy.

Keywords:   American Relief Administration (ARA), Hoover, naval blockade, Germany, hunger in Europe, Versailles, Peace Treaty, Wilson, food aid, U.S. Food Administration

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