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The Political History of American Food AidAn Uneasy Benevolence$
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Barry Riley

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190228873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190228873.001.0001

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From Food Aid to Food Assistance: 1990–2014

From Food Aid to Food Assistance: 1990–2014

Chapter:
(p.450) 20 From Food Aid to Food Assistance: 1990–2014
Source:
The Political History of American Food Aid
Author(s):

Barry Riley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190228873.003.0021

This chapter describes the many changes legislated for American food aid as, first, American nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) succeeded in receiving expanded legislative authority to use food aid for development objectives; second, “food security” became the primary objective of all forms of American food aid; and, third, Title III, Section 416(b) and Title I dwindled into non-availability. The remaining forms (Title II, Food for Progress, and Food for Education) seemed primed to focus on development objectives linked to improving food security. Unfortunately, the combination of budget stringencies, the increasing cost of food, the unwillingness of Congress to “untie” food purchases from domestic American sources, and a rapid increase in emergency relief needs conspired to greatly reduce the amount of food available to NGO and WFP development programs.

Keywords:   food security, Title I, Title II, Title III, McGovern-Dole Food for Education, Food for Progress, emergency needs, 1990 farm bill

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