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The Global Community Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence 2018$
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Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190072506

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190072506.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 December 2019

Statehood and Recognition in International Law: A Post-Colonial Invention

Statehood and Recognition in International Law: A Post-Colonial Invention

Chapter:
(p.139) Statehood and Recognition in International Law: A Post-Colonial Invention
Source:
The Global Community Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence 2018
Author(s):

Jean D’Aspremont

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190072506.003.0005

This article seeks to lay bare some of the main conceptual, theoretical, and normative constructions that have informed the rise of the doctrine of statehood into one of the fundamental doctrines of international law and allowed it to continue to prove most influential in contemporary international legal discourses. In doing so, this article will make the point that the doctrine of statehood has been shaped by both modern and post-colonial heritages. It will be shown that the main components of the doctrine of statehood are very modern in that they are directly inherited from liberal legal thought. It will simultaneously be demonstrated that it is only in the second half of the twentieth century, and more precisely in the wake of the start of the decolonisation process, that all these modern components were assembled and organised in order to compose what is known today as the doctrine of statehood.

Keywords:   decolonialisation, international law, legalism, managerialism, objectivism, recognition, self-determination statehood

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