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A Public Health Guide to Ending the Opioid Epidemic$
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Jay C. Butler and Michael R. Fraser

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190056810

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190056810.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 January 2020

Introduction

Introduction

Why a Public Health Guide to Ending the Opioid Crisis?

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Introduction
Source:
A Public Health Guide to Ending the Opioid Epidemic
Author(s):

Michael R. Fraser

Jay C. Butler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190056810.003.0001

A public health guide to ending the opioid crisis is needed to help frame efforts to go “upstream” and address the root causes of substance use disorder and addiction. In this introduction, the editors provide an overview of the book’s three parts (Fundamentals and Frameworks; Connecting Clinical Perspectives and Public Health Practice; Moving Upstream—Prevention, Partnership, and Public Health). While a great deal of prior work has focused on the clinical aspects of the opioid epidemic, more is needed to address the community-level aspects, including addressing the root causes of addiction, and where public health professionals can intervene at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. The case is made for increasing effort in the areas of primary prevention and policy change to support effective opioid stewardship at the local, state, and federal levels. The editors conclude by stating that communities will not “arrest” or “treat” their way out of this crisis. Instead, we have to redouble efforts to prevent addiction and address the clinical and community aspects of what drives an individual to become addicted in the first place.

Keywords:   prevention, public health leadership, root causes of addiction, social determinants, primary prevention, secondary prevention, tertiary prevention, resilience

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