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Jonathan M. Yeager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199916955

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.001.0001

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Godly Government during a Time of Crisis

Godly Government during a Time of Crisis

Chapter:
(p.390) 61 Godly Government during a Time of Crisis
Source:
Early Evangelicalism
Author(s):

Lemuel Haynes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.003.0062

This chapter presents excerpts from Lemuel Haynes's The Influence of Civil Government on Religion, a sermon delivered at Rutland, West Parish, in Vermont on September 4, 1798. Haynes was an American abolitionist, revivalist, and theologian who grew up an indentured servant on the Massachusetts frontier. He joined the minutemen in 1774 and served as a soldier in the War of Independence. After the War, Haynes was tutored by the New Divinity minister Daniel Farrand of Canaan, Connecticut, becoming a stalwart of evangelical Calvinism. In 1788 he took a post at a Congregational church in Rutland, Vermont. Like other New Divinity men, Haynes interpreted the slave trade and slavery as part of God's providential design. He was an orthodox preacher, a revivalist, and an adherent of Revolutionary-era republicanism. In The Influence of Civil Government on Religion, Haynes contrasted a godly American government guided by George Washington and John Adams to the chaotic and sinful French Reign of Terror.

Keywords:   sermon, Lemuel Haynes, civil government, religion, New Divinity, Calvinism, Congregational church, slave trade, slavery, republicanism

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