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Jonathan M. Yeager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199916955

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.001.0001

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An Appeal to the Higher Ranks of Society

An Appeal to the Higher Ranks of Society

Chapter:
(p.329) 51 An Appeal to the Higher Ranks of Society
Source:
Early Evangelicalism
Author(s):

Hannah More

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.003.0052

This chapter presents excerpts from Hannah More's Thoughts on the Importance of the Manners of the Great to General Society (1788). Although born in relative poverty, More ascended to a position where her literary talents and favorable social standing could showcase the strengths of evangelical Christianity to England's fashionable society. At age twenty-two, More agreed to marry William Turner, a local gentry twenty years her senior. However, the wedding never took place because Turner kept on postponing it for reasons not entirely known. More then turned her attention to writing, publishing poems, essays, and plays in the 1770s. With the help of her patron, the famous English actor David Garrick, More's play Percy became a success. In Thoughts on the Importance of Manners, More called for religious reform from “the Great,” arguing that the higher ranks should lead by example.

Keywords:   plays, Percy, religious reform, Hannah More, Christianity, England, William Turner, David Garrick

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