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Most Underappreciated50 Prominent Social Psychologists Describe Their Most Unloved Work$
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Robert Arkin

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199778188

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199778188.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 November 2019

Your First Word Will Be Your Last Word if It Is Your Only Word

Your First Word Will Be Your Last Word if It Is Your Only Word

Chapter:
(p.233) Your First Word Will Be Your Last Word if It Is Your Only Word
Source:
Most Underappreciated
Author(s):

Schroeder David A.

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199778188.003.0047

David A. Schroeder reflects on his most underappreciated work: a paper entitled, “Attributions and attribution-relations: The effect of level of cognitive development.” Published in 1987 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the study, done in collaboration with David Johnson, Lydia Walker, and Judi Allen, focused on whether causal attributions were related to subsequent behaviors, whether level of cognitive development imposed a boundary condition on the application of attribution theory, and how an attributor's level of cognitive development might affect not only the nature of the attribution made but also the manner in which those attributions are used as guides for future actions.

Keywords:   David A. Schroeder, attributions, attribution-relations, cognitive development, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, David Johnson, Lydia Walker, Judi Allen, behaviors, attribution theory

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