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Most Underappreciated50 Prominent Social Psychologists Describe Their Most Unloved Work$
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Robert Arkin

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199778188

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199778188.001.0001

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Reality Lives! Redeeming an Apparently Unfulfilled Prophecy

Reality Lives! Redeeming an Apparently Unfulfilled Prophecy

Chapter:
(p.202) Reality Lives! Redeeming an Apparently Unfulfilled Prophecy
Source:
Most Underappreciated
Author(s):

Michael Harris Bond

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199778188.003.0040

Michael Harris Bond and behavioral scientist, reflects on his most underappreciated work: a thesis research on the concept of social reality and the opposite of a self-fulfilling prophecy, which he termed “self-reversing prophecy.” Bond examined the possibility that we social actors develop an impression of another person for whatever reasons, then act towards that person in a way that makes his or behavior conform to our impression, rendering others consistent to our mind's eye. He proposed that it is possible to create and sustain the interpersonal reality that surrounds us. He explored these ideas within the context of “behavioral confirmation” as opposed to “behavioral disconfirmation”.

Keywords:   Michael Harris Bond, social reality, self-fulfilling prophecy, self-reversing prophecy, impression, interpersonal reality, behavioral confirmation, behavioral disconfirmation

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