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Among the CreationistsDispatches from the Anti-Evolutionist Frontline$
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Jason Rosenhouse

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199744633

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199744633.001.0001

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Irreducible Complexity

Irreducible Complexity

Chapter:
(p.125) 21 Irreducible Complexity
Source:
Among the Creationists
Author(s):

Jason Rosenhouse

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199744633.003.0021

In this chapter, the author considers the most significant biological argument of intelligent design supporters: the notion of “irreducible complexity.” In The Origin of Species Charles Darwin wrote, “If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed, which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down. But I can find out no such case.” Michael Behe, from Lehigh University, believes he has found the systems that were overlooked by Darwin: “an irreducibly complex biological system, if there is such a thing, would be a powerful challenge to Darwinian evolution.” The author also discusses plausible evolutionary scenarios for a variety of complex adaptations from the viewpoint of biology.

Keywords:   intelligent design, irreducible complexity, The Origin of Species, Charles Darwin, Michael Behe, evolution, complex adaptations, biology

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