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Another Day in the Monkey's Brain$
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Ralph Siegel and Foreword by Oliver Sacks

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199734344

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199734344.001.0001

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Critique of Pure Cortical Topography

Critique of Pure Cortical Topography

Chapter:
(p.59) Nine Critique of Pure Cortical Topography
Source:
Another Day in the Monkey's Brain
Author(s):

Ralph Mitchell Siegel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199734344.003.0009

In this chapter, the author offers a critique of pure cortical topography, with particular reference to the retinotopic map as a key principle used to unlock the function of the cerebral cortex. He first discusses the properties that are embedded within retinotopic maps, along with the idea of the functional architecture proposed by David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel and their demarcation of a whole series of mappings in the primary visual cortex. He then considers constant sensory representations in relation to the idea that the internal cortical representations are fixed and hard wired. He also describes his work on “navigational motion” in collaboration with Milena Raffi and concludes by noting that the functional architecture of the inferior parietal cortex is constantly modified in response to the changing internal and external world.

Keywords:   retinotopic map, cerebral cortex, functional architecture, David Hubel, Torsten Wiesel, primary visual cortex, sensory representations, cortical representations, navigational motion, inferior parietal cortex

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