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Another Day in the Monkey's Brain$
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Ralph Siegel and Foreword by Oliver Sacks

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199734344

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199734344.001.0001

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Chaos Through the Looking Glass

Chaos Through the Looking Glass

Chapter:
(p.15) Four Chaos Through the Looking Glass
Source:
Another Day in the Monkey's Brain
Author(s):

Ralph Mitchell Siegel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199734344.003.0004

In this chapter, the author focuses on Leon Glass's discovery of a set of unexpected visual stimuli that led to an additional understanding of the physiology of visual perception. He discusses the work done by other scientists by building on the Glass patterns, particularly David Marr, a neuroscience theorist who presented Glass's random dot moiré patterns as a perceptual illusion that required integrative features of the visual system as well as a challenge to be solved. He also considers the experiment performed by David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel on the hypercolumn, a set of neurons that tile the primary visual cortex with a cell for every location and every orientation. This tiling of the cortex by orientation is the key to the biological interpretation of the Glass patterns.

Keywords:   visual perception, Leon Glass, Glass patterns, David Marr, neuroscience, David Hubel, Torsten Wiesel, hypercolumn, neurons, primary visual cortex

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