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Rethinking Colonial Pasts through Archaeology$
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Neal Ferris, Rodney Harrison, and Michael V. Wilcox

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199696697

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199696697.001.0001

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Shared Histories

Shared Histories

Rethinking ‘Colonized’ and ‘Colonizer’ in the Archaeology of Colonialism

Chapter:
(p.37) 1 Shared Histories
Source:
Rethinking Colonial Pasts through Archaeology
Author(s):

Rodney Harrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199696697.003.0002

This chapter explores a framework that deals with the archaeology and heritage of cross-cultural interactions in the cattle and sheep ranching (‘pastoral’) industries of Australia. It first provides a historical background on government policies on aboriginal people and pastoral labour in Australia between 1788 and 1988 before suggesting some ways in which archaeology might address idealised notions of ‘coloniser’ and ‘colonised’. It then outlines the various strategic and mundane ways in which both colonised and coloniser engage with their social and Indigenous worlds, express notions of individual and group identity, and at the same time deal with the very real inequalities and conflicts that characterise colonial and postcolonial relations of difference.

Keywords:   archaeology, heritage, cross-cultural interactions, ranching, Australia, coloniser, colonised, identity, pastoral labour, aboriginal people

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