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Codon EvolutionMechanisms and Models$
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Gina M. Cannarozzi and Adrian Schneider

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199601165

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199601165.001.0001

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Codon models as a vehicle for reconciling population genetics with inter-specific sequence data

Codon models as a vehicle for reconciling population genetics with inter-specific sequence data

Chapter:
(p.97) Chapter 7 Codon models as a vehicle for reconciling population genetics with inter-specific sequence data
Source:
Codon Evolution
Author(s):

Jeffrey L. Thorne

Nicolas Lartillot

Nicolas Rodrigue

Sang Chul Choi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199601165.003.0007

This chapter examines how population genetic inferences can be made from inter-specific data, focusing on the study of inter-specific genetic variation in protein-coding DNA. It begins with a discussion on the phenotypic effects of genetic change and on why these effects warrant specific attention when attempting to detect and characterize natural selection. It then outlines the approach of Halpern and Bruno (1998) for quantifying mutation-selection balance, and discusses a somewhat dissatisfying way that existing evolutionary models can be connected to the Halpern–Bruno idea. It also provides a more detailed explanation of the Halpern–Bruno variation used by Choi et al. (2008).

Keywords:   codon models, population genetic inference, inter-specific data, mutation-selection balance, Halpern and Bruno

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