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Music and the MindEssays in honour of John Sloboda$
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Irène Deliège and Jane Davidson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199581566

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199581566.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 November 2019

Salience of melodic tones in short-term memory: dependence on phrasing, metre, duration, register, and tonal hierarchy

Salience of melodic tones in short-term memory: dependence on phrasing, metre, duration, register, and tonal hierarchy

Chapter:
(p.139) Chapter 8 Salience of melodic tones in short-term memory: dependence on phrasing, metre, duration, register, and tonal hierarchy
Source:
Music and the Mind
Author(s):

Mario Baroni

Rossana Dalmonte

Roberto Caterina

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199581566.003.0008

The present research, developed in the field of studies on melody perception, aims to understand the features that contribute to making a single note salient during a test of short-term memory. A brief melodic fragment was presented to our subjects (musicians and non-musicians) together with a modified version with one single note varied. The subjects were invited to indicate which note had been changed. The analysis of the results revealed that the changed note was detected on the basis of its level of salience. Our first aim was to find out the features that make a note salient and hence its change detectable. Within this frame of reference we studied the salience of melodic tones in the short-term memory taking into account different aspects: location in the phrase, metre, duration, tonal hierarchy, register, and memory of previous experiences. A further aim was to test the relationships between the rules of a compositional grammar (Baroni, Dalmonte, & Jacoboni, 1999) and the actual perception of structures during the listening. The results showed that in some cases there is a convergence between composition rules and perception procedures, while in other cases important differences emerge.

Keywords:   salience, music, melody perception, music psychology, musical notes, short-term memory

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