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Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BCCrossing the Divide$
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Tom Moore and Xosê-Lois Armada

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199567959

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.001.0001

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Person, Family, and Community

Person, Family, and Community

The Social Structure of Iron Age Societies Seen through the Organization of their Housing in North-western Europe

Chapter:
(p.358) 16 Person, Family, and Community
Source:
Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BC
Author(s):

Dimitri Mathiot

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.003.0016

This chapter examines the rural organization of Iron Age societies within northern Gaul. It focuses on the structure of settlements and their related territories, in particular exploring the place of the individual, the family, and local communities within the wider landscape. First, it discusses the three different forms of domestic units present in North-western Europe, their location, and their spatial organization. Secondly, it demonstrates how the landscape was organized during the Hallstatt and early La Tène periods (800–275 BC). The third section considers changes that took place during the third century BC, the emergence of stabilized settlement patterns, and the new socials interactions that these new forms of settlement imply.

Keywords:   Iron Age, rural organization, northern Gaul, settlements, domestic units, landscape, Hallstatt period, early La Tène period, social interactions

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