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The Oxford History of Historical WritingVolume 4: 1800-1945$
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Stuart Macintyre, Juan Maiguashca, and Attila Pók

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199533091

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199533091.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 11 July 2020

The Transformation of History in China and Japan

The Transformation of History in China and Japan

Chapter:
(p.491) Chapter 24 The Transformation of History in China and Japan
Source:
The Oxford History of Historical Writing
Author(s):

Axel Schneider

Stefan Tanaka

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199533091.003.0025

This chapter focuses on China and Japan's traditions of historiography. These were closely connected, with China initially exerting a formative influence on Japan. In China, concepts of the ideal socio-political order centred on the ruling clan and the worship of its ancestors, perceiving an act of divine revelation and heavenly truth that was possible to measure through history. This chapter also states that in Tokugawa Japan, a strand of neo-Confucian scholarship became critical during the gradual separation of the past from the ethical ideals located in the ancient Chinese sages. Two schools that were critical in the emergence of a modern history were kōgaku and kokugaku.

Keywords:   China, Japan, historiography, divine revelation, heavenly truth, Tokugawa, neo-Confucian scholarship, kōgaku, kokugaku

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