Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY YEARBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AND JURISPRUDENCEGlobal Trends: Law, Policy & Justice Essays in Honour of Professor Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

M. Cherif Bassiouni, Gomula Joanna, Paolo Mengozzi, John G. Merrills, Rafael Nieto Navia, Anna Oriolo, William Schabas, and Anna Vigorito

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199332304

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199332304.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 January 2020

Evolutionary Global Politics*

Evolutionary Global Politics*

Chapter:
(p.469) 22 Evolutionary Global Politics*
Source:
THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY YEARBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE
Author(s):

George Modelski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199332304.003.0022

Debates and research on the experience of world powers such as Britain or the United States have focused on two questions: why in the modern world do some states acquire a position of global prominence while others fall behind? And why is it that those powers that have risen so successfully also tend to relinquish their position? This chapter demonstrates how these two questions can be answered parsimoniously within the framework of the theory of long cycles of global politics. It proposes an evolutionary, mechanism/process model of global politics that rests upon the following core propositions: evolution, including social evolution, is a pattern of the universe; evolutionary processes necessarily occur in favorable conditions; evolutionary processes activate the mechanisms of variation, cooperation, selection, and reinforcement; and evolutionary processes co-evolve with other evolutionary processes.

Keywords:   global powers, long cycles, global politics, evolutionary processes

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .