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On the Art of Singing$
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Richard Miller

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195098259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.001.0001

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How to Really Bomb a Master Class

How to Really Bomb a Master Class

Chapter:
61 How to Really Bomb a Master Class
Source:
On the Art of Singing
Author(s):

Richard Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.003.0061

This chapter considers the many different ways that a voice teacher and student could ruin a master class. On the part of the voice student, he or she could come onto the stage carrying a copy of the music he or she would be singing, something he or she has looked at only recently, even though the advance materials mention that all music to be performed in the public master class is to be memorized. The student may also announce to the master teacher that he or she has chosen to sing an item full of technical problems that he or she would like to have solved during the twenty minutes allotted to him/her. Also, choosing an eight-minute aria that will take up one-third of his/her time, and looking indignant if he or she is interrupted, are both ways of sabotaging a master class. For the master teacher, he or she may interrupt the singer after the first eight bars.

Keywords:   voice teacher, master class, voice student, music, singing, aria, singer

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