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On the Art of Singing$
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Richard Miller

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195098259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.001.0001

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A Stroll Past the Practice Rooms

A Stroll Past the Practice Rooms

Chapter:
58 A Stroll Past the Practice Rooms
Source:
On the Art of Singing
Author(s):

Richard Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.003.0058

This chapter considers what voice students do in the practice room. Young singers fall in love with exciting vocal literature, and there scarcely exists a voice teacher who doesn't have to warn talented students against singing dramatic literature too early. Practice room areas can be competitive. When singers hear other singers, something is triggered in the mind; an empathic kinesthetic response occurs. Like excited youngsters around the swimming pool, they enter the fray. The vocal fatigue the student brings to the studio is often the result of having sung destructive vocal literature outside the lesson. The voice student almost always feels that he or she can tackle more advanced literature than he or she is able to handle. Reining in ambitious students is part of responsible voice teaching. Every teacher should warn each student about the negative effects of abuses and misuses of the singing voice. It is especially painful when a teacher discovers that abuse is taking place in the practice room itself.

Keywords:   practice room, vocal literature, voice teacher, singing, voice student, voice teaching, singing voice

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