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On the Art of Singing$
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Richard Miller

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195098259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.001.0001

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Vocal Coach or Vocal Technician?

Vocal Coach or Vocal Technician?

Chapter:
43 Vocal Coach or Vocal Technician?
Source:
On the Art of Singing
Author(s):

Richard Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.003.0043

This chapter considers the roles of vocal coach and voice teacher in teaching students of singing. Waste of time, energy, and money is a normal part of the building of a professional singing career, but many of these losses could be avoided if the singer were to recognize what mode of instruction is appropriate at each moment in career development, and if the singer were to take sequential steps in the process of preparation by being aware of what is out there in the way of instruction. One of the saddest career-preparation syndromes can be seen in the singer who believes that a high-priced coach or voice teacher whose time the singer has bought will provide contacts for entrance into the professional world. The roles of vocal coach and voice teacher frequently overlap, but they are not identical. Singers who are in need of a voice teacher should not hire a coach, while those who are established artists with no problems should not go to the teacher who “builds” voices.

Keywords:   vocal coach, voice teacher, singing, singing career, career development, singer

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