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On the Art of Singing$
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Richard Miller

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195098259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.001.0001

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How Is Legato Achieved in Singing?

How Is Legato Achieved in Singing?

Chapter:
(p.122) 38 How Is Legato Achieved in Singing?
Source:
On the Art of Singing
Author(s):

Richard Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.003.0038

This chapter considers how legato (from the Italian verb legare, meaning to bind or tie) is achieved in singing. Legato is the result of binding one sound to the next. There is a strong conviction among vocal cognoscenti that excellence in singing can exist only by mastering the art of legato. Traditional vocal literatures call for a high degree of stable legato singing. As with any musical instrument, in the singing voice it is the progression of uninterrupted sound that permits legato. If the segments of a sung phrase go forward in contiguous fashion, legato is the un-induced result. Vocal legato depends upon continuity of vocal sound. It is essential to all cultivated vocalism, as well as efficient vocal production and artistry.

Keywords:   vocal legato, singing, singing voice, vocal sound, vocalism, vocal production, artistry

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