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Improbable ScholarsThe Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America’s Schools$
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David L. Kirp

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199987498

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199987498.001.0001

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Where Fun Comes To Die (And Be Reborn)

Where Fun Comes To Die (And Be Reborn)

George Washington Elementary School—Reprise

Chapter:
(p.166) 7 Where Fun Comes To Die (And Be Reborn)
Source:
Improbable Scholars
Author(s):

David L. Kirp

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199987498.003.0009

This chapter revisits George Washington Elementary School to survey the progress of the third-grade students in Room 210. The students no longer fidget when their teacher reads aloud, and when she gives them her narrowed-eyes look they become church-mouse quiet. A glance suffices to awaken a child from his reverie. The kids have the hour-by-hour routine down pat. They know which day they're supposed to go to the classroom's well-stocked library or listen as the stories of the week are read aloud or tackle an assignment on the computer. There is evidence of learning everywhere. The youngsters are writing longer papers and drawing on a richer vocabulary to express themselves. The coin-counting and numerical calculations that comprise “Every Day Counts” have become so ingrained that the children complete the tasks largely on their own. The kids' individual folders, which contain the best of their schoolwork, keep getting fatter, and the work keeps improving.

Keywords:   public schools, public school education, elementary school students, library, routine

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