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Imagining the PastHistorical Fiction in New Kingdom Egypt$
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Colleen Manassa

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199982226

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199982226.001.0001

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The Capture of Joppa

The Capture of Joppa

Chapter:
(p.66) Chapter 3 The Capture of Joppa
Source:
Imagining the Past
Author(s):

Colleen Manassa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199982226.003.0003

This chapter examines the story The Capture of Joppa, set during the reign of Thutmose III, but copied during the early Nineteenth Dynasty, preserved only in papyrus British Museum 10060 (P. Harris 500). The story unfolds in a plausible historical setting, with mention of both the maryannu and Apiru, suggesting that the author set out to use authentic Eighteenth Dynasty elements to create the narrative’s setting. New examinations of the loan words and foreign elements within the text, including tekhbesti-baskets and the awenet-staff suggest that the author intentionally used foreign elements to express Egyptian imperial domination within the tale. The military stratagem of smuggling soldiers in transport containers or other “tribute” is traced from ancient Egypt through the Greek Trojan horse and the Persian Shahnameh.

Keywords:   Joppa, basketry, loan words, Thutmose III, smiting scenes, Military stratagem, Djehuty, Egyptian general, Siege, Apiru, Maryannu

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