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Evolutionary Games in Natural, Social, and Virtual Worlds$
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Daniel Friedman and Barry Sinervo

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199981151

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199981151.001.0001

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Rock-Paper-Scissors Everywhere

Rock-Paper-Scissors Everywhere

Chapter:
(p.177) 7 Rock-Paper-Scissors Everywhere
Source:
Evolutionary Games in Natural, Social, and Virtual Worlds
Author(s):

Daniel Friedman

Barry Sinervo

Daniel Friedman

Barry Sinervo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199981151.003.0007

This chapter documents general RPS interactions in mating systems for isopods, damselflies, fish, and birds. It applies Hadamard products to show how mate preferences can change one RPS game into another. Regular RPS cycles in one sex favor invasion of a rule of thumb in the other sex in which common mating types are avoided and rare types are preferred. From such interactions, the one-population true RPS game is converted into an apostatic RPS game. The RPS can also be broken if mates evolve preference for self-mating types, with implications for cooperation and speciation. A new co-evolutionary model describes predator/prey interactions with learning. The model is referred to as ABC-NR after the conspicuous and toxic aposematic model, harmless Batesian mimics, and cryptic types in prey, while predators are either naÏve or responsive to aposematic signals. Fisher’s conjecture of an advantage from prey clustering is required for an interior ESS.

Keywords:   rock-paper-scissors mating games, predator-prey co-evolution, aposematic, Batesian, cryptic, naÏve versus responsive predators

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