Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Commonwealth of LettersBritish Literary Culture and the Emergence of Postcolonial Aesthetics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter J. Kalliney

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977970

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977970.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 December 2019

Race and Modernist Anthologies

Race and Modernist Anthologies

Nancy Cunard, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Ezra Pound

Chapter:
(p.38) 2. Race and Modernist Anthologies
Source:
Commonwealth of Letters
Author(s):

Peter J. Kalliney

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977970.003.0002

Chapter Two examines Nancy Cunard's massive Negro anthology (1934) and her dealings with three important collaborators: Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes, and Claude McKay. Using archival sources, this chapter asks why the bigoted Pound would contribute to Cunard's project of racial reconciliation - and strike up an unlikely correspondence with Langston Hughes in the process - and also why Claude McKay, who was in political sympathy with Cunard, would angrily withdraw his contribution. It argues that modernist networks, with their complex systems of obligation and reciprocation - and not political affiliations or racial identities - should be used to explain the production history and meaning of Cunard's volume.

Keywords:   Nancy Cunard, Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Negro anthology, Race, Colonialism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .