Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Counting Civilian CasualtiesAn Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 February 2020

Using Surveys to Estimate Casualties Post-Conflict

Using Surveys to Estimate Casualties Post-Conflict

Developments for the Developing World

Chapter:
(p.97) 6 Using Surveys to Estimate Casualties Post-Conflict
Source:
Counting Civilian Casualties
Author(s):

Jana Asher

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.003.0006

Random sample surveys use structured questions to elicit responses from representative populations, providing systematic, standardized data subject to statistical analysis. Although survey research is a mature methodology, its use in casualty estimation is accompanied by particular challenges to those who address the complex, sensitive issues associated with eliciting reports related to civilian casualties in post-conflict situations in developing countries. The chapter discusses how those challenges can be addressed and provides illustrative examples with a focus on the author’s research in East Timor (now Timor-Leste) and Sierra Leone.

Keywords:   civilian casualties, methodology, peacebuilding, survey research, developing countries, casualty estimation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .