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The Relevance of RomanticismEssays on German Romantic Philosophy$
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Dalia Nassar

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199976201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199976201.001.0001

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Romanticism and Language

Romanticism and Language

Chapter:
(p.68) 4 Romanticism and Language
Source:
The Relevance of Romanticism
Author(s):

Michael N. Forster

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199976201.003.0005

A common misconception about the German romantics, that they were theoretical lightweights, confronts an especially powerful counterexample in the case of their views about language. Building on their Herder’s revolutionary views about language—especially, his principles that thought is essentially dependent on and bounded by language, that meanings/concepts consist in word-usages, and that thoughts, concepts, and language vary profoundly between periods, cultures, and even individuals—the leading romantics Schleiermacher and Friedrich Schlegel made vitally important new contributions to the philosophy of language, linguistics, hermeneutics, and translation theory.

Keywords:   German romanticism, Schlegel, Schleiermacher, philosophy of language, linguistics, hermeneutics, translation theory, meaning, holism

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