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The Relevance of RomanticismEssays on German Romantic Philosophy$
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Dalia Nassar

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199976201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199976201.001.0001

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History, Succession, and German Romanticism

History, Succession, and German Romanticism

Chapter:
(p.47) 3 History, Succession, and German Romanticism
Source:
The Relevance of Romanticism
Author(s):

Karl Ameriks

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199976201.003.0004

The three basic terms of the Athenaeum Fragments’ famous characterization of romanticism as “progressive universal poetry” provides a useful framework for defining a distinctively romantic conception of history, one that is all at once political, philosophical, and aesthetic in a broadly religious sense. This chapter argues that, especially for our late modern age, this early German romantic conception has advantages over merely linear, circular, or chaotic conceptions. The argument is illustrated by reference to the form and content of Hölderlin’s work, especially one stanza of his poem “Celebration of Peace.” The influence of Kant’s work on this aspect of Hölderlin’s thought is also emphasized.

Keywords:   history, succession, religion, exemplary, Friedrich Schlegel, G. W. F. Hegel, F. W. J. Schelling, Friedrich Nietzsche, Friedrich Hölderlin, Immanuel Kant

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