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Dangerous RhythmWhy Movie Musicals Matter$
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Richard Barrios

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199973842

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199973842.001.0001

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Painting the Clouds Snow White, South Park, and Other Ways to Animate a Musical

Painting the Clouds Snow White, South Park, and Other Ways to Animate a Musical

Chapter:
(p.190) Chapter 10 Painting the Clouds Snow White, South Park, and Other Ways to Animate a Musical
Source:
Dangerous Rhythm
Author(s):

Richard Barrios

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199973842.003.0011

From 1928 and Steamboat Willie onward, music has been an intrinsic part of the animated film. Starting with shorts and moving into features, song and scoring have taken the cartoon through the triumph of Snow White and the ambition of Fantasia, past the plateau of Cinderella and the comeback of The Little Mermaid, and onward to the nasty hilarity and parody of South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut. Whether drawn or digital, animation has lent itself to musical treatment with, frequently, more zest and imagination than live action—although the cartoon remake of The King and I was genuinely appalling. Was South Park the final great hurrah of the animated musical? Not much since then has equalled it.

Keywords:   Walt Disney, Mickey Mouse, Steamboat Willie, Fantasia, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Trey Parker & Matt Stone

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